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Claim the Mountain


CHIPETA RISING

Together we can move her mountain

Sign the Petition

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Claim the Mountain


CHIPETA RISING

Together we can move her mountain

Sign the Petition

Above: Photo by Wojtek Rychlik, Pikes Peak Photo

Help Us Move the Name

We welcome your support to move the name Chipeta Mountain, from a lower sub peak to the true 13,472-foot summit of the mountain. On this website you will find a variety of documents and photographs to introduce you to the Queen of the Utes, Chipeta, and why moving name is so important. We also ask that you sign our petition that we will submit as a show of support for our proposal to the U.S. Geological Survey's Board on Geographic Names to relocate the name.

This effort was initiated by Wayne Iverson, author of Hobo Sapien: Freight Train Hopping Tao and Zen. It is sponsored by the book’s website WiseHobo.com, local community organizers and designers Sellars Project Space, and Colorado Thirteeners. We welcome your assistance in spreading the word by sharing this cause's information from our website and our page on Facebook.

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A Cold Shoulder for Chipeta


Chipeta was an Indian Rights Advocate, Diplomat, and Peacekeeper. She used diplomacy to try to achieve peace with the white settlers in Colorado. She was highly respected by both the Ute and white people. In 1985, Chipeta was inducted into Colorado Women's Hall of Fame.

Sign the Petition

A Cold Shoulder for Chipeta


Chipeta was an Indian Rights Advocate, Diplomat, and Peacekeeper. She used diplomacy to try to achieve peace with the white settlers in Colorado. She was highly respected by both the Ute and white people. In 1985, Chipeta was inducted into Colorado Women's Hall of Fame.

Sign the Petition

Above: Photo and labels by ColoradoThirteeners.com

A Cold Shoulder for Chipeta

Southern Chaffee County boasts a fabulous view of three mountains in the Sawatch Range named for a Ute (Nuche) Indian family – Mount Ouray, Chipeta Mountain, and Pahlone Peak. Indians don’t typically name mountains after themselves, so my guess is that some “white guilt” went into that honor – like a developer who names streets after the trees cut down to build a subdivision. But there is another problem – perhaps an error on the part of the applicant or the U. S. Geologic Survey Board on Geographic Names (BGN).

Mount Ouray and Pahlone Peak are named for the highest point on their respective mountains, but Chipeta Mountain is named for the second highest point on its massif and is actually out of plain sight. Thus an effort to commemorate an important woman ends up coming across as more of an insult.  So perhaps a campaign to move the name “Chipeta Mountain” from the 12,850- foot sub peak to the 13,472-foot highpoint is in order. 

Read the full article


Documents & Photographs

click on thumbnail to enlarge - Above: Photo by Wojtek Rychlik, Pikes Peak Photo

click on thumbnail to enlarge - Photo and labels by Coloradothirteeners.com

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click on thumbnail to enlarge - Topographic map of Mount Ouray (left) and Chipeta Mountain (right).

click on thumbnail to enlarge - Photo by Kevin Baker

click on thumbnail to enlarge - Photo by Kevin Baker

click on thumbnail to enlarge - Photo by Kevin Baker

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Who Was Chipeta?


"Mount Ouray and Pahlone Peak are named for the highest point on their respective mountains, but Chipeta Mountain is named for the second highest point on its massif and is actually out of plain sight. Thus an effort to commemorate an important woman ends up coming across as more of an insult."

Sign the Petition

Who Was Chipeta?


"Mount Ouray and Pahlone Peak are named for the highest point on their respective mountains, but Chipeta Mountain is named for the second highest point on its massif and is actually out of plain sight. Thus an effort to commemorate an important woman ends up coming across as more of an insult."

Sign the Petition

Who Was Chipeta

In 1843, Chipeta (White Singing Bird) was born to the Kiowa Apache Tribe in what is now Conejos, Colorado. Found as the only survivor of a massacre, Chipeta would evention become a trusted advisor and confidant to her husband, Chief Ouray of the Tabaguache (Uncompahgre) Ute Tribe.

Chipeta was known as an Indian Rights Advocate, Diplomat, and Peacekeeper. She died in 1924 in Utah and eventually her remains were moved to the grounds of the Ute Museum in Montrose, Colorado, where Ouray and Chipeta lived from 1874-1880.


Photographs of Chipeta

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Updates


"Chipeta was a member of the Tabeguache band of Ute Indians. Tabeguache is a Ute word meaning “people who live on the warm side of the mountain.” Let’s get this remarkable woman’s name on the warm side of her mountain, not on the cold shoulder."

Sign the Petition

Updates


"Chipeta was a member of the Tabeguache band of Ute Indians. Tabeguache is a Ute word meaning “people who live on the warm side of the mountain.” Let’s get this remarkable woman’s name on the warm side of her mountain, not on the cold shoulder."

Sign the Petition

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Donations


Donations


Contribute to the Campaign

Donate

Chipeta Mountain has taken on all the expenses of launching this cause. If you would like to contribute we welcome your donations. Chipeta Mountain is not a 501(c)3 nor a nonprofit which can offer a tax deductible donation.

Volunteer

We can use help in sharing information from our website and from our Facebook page in order to drive people to sign our petition and to be become more informed as to the cause and the history of Chipeta.

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